Housing Policy

Processing paper work

It takes entirely too long for moving paper requests to be processed even when a participant is livig in uninhabitable conditions. The process of aquiring Moving papers have gotten to be very discouringing and has caused participants to loose out on potential new housing. The rent negotiation and inspection of new rentals are also a lenghty process tha often cause landlords to back out of renting to voucher holders. some ...more »

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Your Top 2 Ideas for Plan 2.0

Section 3 Reform to pay decent living wage

Based on HUD's guidelines for section 3 hires, PPM firms and the Housing Authority are incentivized to hire those of low income and very low income in order to promote economic self sufficiency. However, the wages paid often are below that what are necessary to be eligible for public housing. For example, an employee at a PPM for the CHA, with a college degree is often paid a wage that is below the individual income limits ...more »

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Citizen Participation and Communication

Unity

The most important step I see in this new plan is to create a sense of unity and connectivity between the organizations individuals involved. Whatever steps are taken, all parties must be on the same page. We also must first find the true needs of those being served. That is, we have to consult the homeless people that we are attempting to house, to better understand their situations and overall needs.

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Development Focus

better conditons means better pple

I think for those who are trying to get into the structure of living out of the "projects" mentality would be for those who are working, married with children should have the rights to advance to the next step. Some pple are not at that point in life where they can move on, but for those who are trying to make it and live righteous should have the opportunity to move up the ladder. This day in age is very messed up.No ...more »

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Housing Policy

RE-ENTRY AND HOUSING

By any standards, folks who are re-entering their communities after incarceration do not have an easy time integrating back into their neighborhoods. The extraordinary difficulties include internal baggage they carry from the experience of prison, family and social disruption, absence of opportunities in the community, and reputations (with themselves and others) as criminals and outsiders. They ordinarily get no reliable ...more »

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Housing Policy

Provide stability for the formerly incarcerated

HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan is encouraging Public Housing Authorities around the country to loosen their restrictions on allowing formerly incarcerated people to access housing. People who have worked to change their lives need stable housing to rebuild their life and avoid recidivism. CHA should be a national leader in providing housing for people who have paid their debt to society. All of our communities are safer ...more »

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Resident Services

Technology Training

CHA should continue to offer opportunities for residents and voucher holders to receive computer training, if current program with Tech Services could be expanded as well as promoted more this could help residents.

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Development Focus

Permanent Housing Rent to Own With Land Contract (No Mortgages)

If voucher funds could be used to purchase homes, initially on a rent to own basis, then if the family meets appropriate and reasonable requirements the voucher can be used along with a Land Contract to purchase the home over time. With Land Contracts there is little of no need for financing or mortgages. Homes could be paid off sooner without interest bearing financing. Minimize the cycle of generations on program, ...more »

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Housing Availability

Legacy Housing Needs Overhaul

As a person who has applied for housing multiple times since the early 90's and never been chosen for a waiting list, I see definite problems that need looking into. Take my family members for instance. My aunt moved into public housing in the early 60's. Her children became adults and were granted apartments in the 80's. Their children became adults in the 90's and also given apartments. In the early 2000's when their ...more »

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